Emergency Management Roles

Please see attachments for transcript and full description of assignment and follow the instructions. Discussion 1: Emergency Management RolesCompetencies Addressed in This DiscussionFor the purpose of this discussion, view the Emergency Response simulation from this unit’s studies. In the simulation, the fire chief begins establishing incident command before the emergency manager is on the scene. In many cases this will be the norm. The emergency manager is not always on duty 24/7, but there is usually a fire chief or other in command. These are usually the first responding units or immediate backup. This is why it is important to have a basic understanding of the Incident Command System. Many police and fire departments require their personnel to be certified in the FEMA Incident Command System by taking an ICS 100-200 and 700 course. The courses are also required at some police and fire academies. These courses teach the basic principles of what the fire chief is using in this emergency management scenario.Discussion 2: Evacuate or Shelter in Place?Competencies Addressed in This DiscussionFor the purpose of this discussion, view the Emergency Response simulation from this unit’s studies. In the simulation, Commander Stevers decides to evacuate all residencies and businesses in the hot zone, with the exception of the stadium. He made this decision based on the information he had and his training. That information and training is vital to saving lives. As you view the scenario, consider the information you have learned from the FEMA courses. Consider how this information may have factored into Commander Stevers’s decision making
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Introduction
The situations you are about to witness actually occurred in Riverbend City several years ago.
In this mission, a train wreck occurs with many hazardous chemicles being released into the air and the river.
Coincidentally, there is a youth soccer tournament being held at Eastman stadium. As the incident occurs, we
see how the key stakeholders in the emergency management of the city respond to the crisis.
While you are going through the mission, pay attention to the role conflicts that occur between the
stakeholders and note how decisions are made. Note the response actions and think about the risk involved in
those decisions.
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City County Building | Mayor’s Office
(One month later – Last Day of Tournament) In this scene, Mayor Keith Bauer is consulting with his newly
appointed emergency manager, Jenny Cunningham. This is the first crisis that has occured since Jenny was
hired and Mayor Bauer gives her some advice.
Jenny tells Mayor Bauer about the train derailment.
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:
Keith ? we’ve got an incident downtown.
MAYOR KEITH BAUER:
What’s happened?
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:
A Southern Inlet Metropolitan train has derailed. It was carrying hazardous materials and at least a dozen cars
are off the rails and compromised. Initial reports indicate that chlorine and anhydrous ammonia might have
been released ? probably other chemicals but that’s not confirmed. Fire is on the scene and they’re
establishing incident command.
MAYOR KEITH BAUER:
Without you?
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:
Yup. It’s all good though ? Dean Mitchell called me as soon as he got on site and realized that it was bigger
than just a fire response. This is the first real incident since I’ve been in this role. I think I can cut them some
slack.
MAYOR KEITH BAUER:
Don’t be too willing to put up with this kind of thing. There’s a long history of turf wars when it comes to
incident response. That’s one of the reasons I brought you on board. We need management and not infighting.
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:
I understand. I’ve got a pretty good relationship with Mitchell, but that doesn’t mean I’m going to let him run
this incident. I just think the dispatch people dropped the ball. I’ll talk to them after this is all over.
MAYOR KEITH BAUER:
I think that’s wise. Have you spoken with the Southern Inlet people?
JENNY CUNNINGHAM:
Not yet? I have a call out to their emergency operations manager, but he hasn’t gotten back to me.
(Phone rings in background)
MAYOR KEITH BAUER:
Ok, you need to get moving. Keep me posted.
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City County Building | Mayor’s Office
Glen Edwards updates Mayor Bauer on the accident.
EDWARDS:
Keith ? we’ve got a train derailment at the Clellen Bridge. Explosions and apparently some sort of chemical
release.
BAUER:
Yes. I just heard about it from Jenny Cunningham. Fire activated the ICS system and Dean Mitchell has
assumed command. Jenny is heading over to take charge.
EDWARDS:
We have event command over at Eastman Stadium assessing the situation. They have a stadium full of soccer
moms and their kids.
CUNNINGHAM:
That’s right ? today was the last day of the tournament. Who’s in charge over there?
EDWARDS:
Matt Stevers.
CUNNINGHAM:
Okay ? I am heading over to the accident site. When I talked to Dean, he said he had his folks working up a
plume analysis. I should be there in fifteen minutes, but I have my radio and my cell. I’d like a status update
from Matt Stevers as soon as possible.
EDWARDS:
I’ll make sure he knows that. Anything else?
CUNNINGHAM:
Not right now.
BAUER:
Jenny, keep me posted of any changes and updates. I don’t want any surprises.
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Accident ite | Incident Command
Engine 9 is first on the scene and Captain Travis Goodman immediately activates the Incident Command
System and takes the role of Incident Commander. The city’s emergency response plan is implanted and key
personnel are now arriving on site. Dean Mitchell, deputy Fire Chief, will take the role of Incident Commander
for the duration of the event.
Captain Goodman briefs Chief Mitchell, who will take command of the incident.
TRAVIS GOODMAN, FIRE CAPTAIN, ENGINE 9 – CAPTAIN OF FIRE STATION 9, RANKING FIRST
RESPONDER:
Chief Mitchell, I’m glad to see you, Sir.
DEAN MITCHELL, DEPUTY FIRE CHIEF (INCOMING ONSITE COMMANDER):
Captain Goodman, it looks like you’ve got things under control. Are you ready to give me a transfer of
command briefing?
GOODMAN:
Absolutely. Here’s the ICS Form 201. Let me walk you through it.
At approximately 8:15 a.m., a Southern Inlet Metropolitan freight train was involved in an accident and 17 of
its 62 cars derailed. Several of these cars were carrying hazardous materials and at least five tanker cars were
breached. At least one of the derailed cars exploded, causing multiple small fires which have been brought
under control, though the tankers are still burning.
It is unclear what caused the explosions, but several of the chemicals carried in the cars were flammable and/or
explosive. One car and an undetermined number of drums were thrown into the river by the explosions.
At this time we’re aware of two casualties?a motorist lost control of her vehicle and crashed into one of the
derailed railroad cars. There was also, a youth struck by debris from the crash and taken to RCMC.
Engine 9 was first on the scene and an incident command post was established. Both lanes of I-60 have been
closed as well as the Clellen Bridge.
We have initiated evacuation of the area within a mile radius of the crash site. Winds are currently southsoutheast at 5 -10 miles per hour.
Current objectives are spelled out in part six of the briefing form, but we’ve been focusing on: 1) ensuring that
response operations are conducted in accordance with hazmat and other relevant guidelines; 2) locating,
triaging, and transporting all injured parties; and 3) evacuating all residencies and businesses within the hot
zone.
The law enforcement group has begun the evacuation and the Red Cross has opened a shelter at Kennedy High
School.
In terms of organization, the command staff consists of Mark Hinkley, safety officer, Kitty Brown, liaison
officer, Lara McKenzie is the public information officer, and Allen Durgan is here as logistics chief.
We’ve got Sergeant Pete Lindner supervising the law enforcement group, Stewart Mason supervising the
medical group, and Bill Compton supervising the fire group. The resource summary is pretty straightforward
and you got that there on the 201.
MITCHELL:
Alright. Let’s just go around the table and I want an update from each of you. I know some of you, but go
ahead and introduce yourself and give your role for anyone who doesn’t know you.
Conversation 2: ALLEN DURGAN, LOGISTICS CHIEF
Allen Durgan, Logistics. Our biggest concern has been the wind conditions. Winds are still south-southeast at
about 10 miles per hour, but NOAH tells us they’re going to be variable both in direction and strength all day. I
spoke to Peggy Truman over at the health department. She’s on her way here and she’s contacted her
environmental health team. They’ll help with the plume analysis, but we know right now that the plume is over
the Washington Allston school. There were exposures there and they’ve been taken to RCMC already. The
mayor’s office was contacted and they implemented the reverse 911 in the evacuation area, but we need to get
some help with transportation. I’d like to pull in 10 city buses to help move people out quickly.
Conversation 3: KITTY BROWN, LIAISON OFFICER
Kitty Brown, Liaison Officer. I’ve been working with Allen on coordinating transportation for the evacuation.
I’m waiting to hear back from city metro for an ETA on the buses we asked for. I am also working with
Stewart on getting some medical assistance out here. Both public health and RCMC are looking at how many
nurses they can send us.
Conversation 4: LARA MCKENZIE, PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICER
Hi ? Lara McKenzie, Public Information Officer. I notified Rick Hilliard over at Mayor Bauer’s office and
given him an initial briefing of what is known and what we’re doing. I’ve held one press briefing already?
about 20 minutes ago?and asked the media to help put the word out about the evacuation and the highway
and bridge closing. Rick will be holding a press conference in about an hour and I’m working with his office
on the press release for that.
Conversation 5: MARK HINKLEY, SAFETY OFFICER
Mark Hinkley, Safety. RCMC HAZMAT is on-site and Chief Drescher and I are coordinating decon needs. It
looks like, in addition to the chlorine and anhydrous ammonia, there’s hydrochloric acid that’s been released
both on land and into the river. We’re looking at setting decon over in the parking lot of Eastman Stadium, but
we need to confirm with NOAH that the plume isn’t likely to move over there.
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Eastman Stadium | Stadium Commander’s
Office
Emergency response operations are put into place with Matt Stevers as the event commander. Matt Stevers
contacts Paul Schwoboda, the stadium commander to brief him on the situation and discuss what to do with the
people in the stadium.
Event Commander Matt Stevers checks in with Commander Paul Schwoboda about the situation at the
stadium..
PAUL SCHWOBODA – STADIUM COMMANDER:
Hello? Chief Stevens? Commander Paul Schwoboda here.
MATT STEVERS – EVENT COMMANDER:
Paulie, it looks like we have a serious situation here in the city. There’s been a train derailment not too far from
the stadium. I’m at the incident command site. I’m the event commander.
PAUL SCHWOBODA:
Holy sh…
MATT STEVERS:
…uh, right. It was carrying chemicals – chlorine and anhydrous ammonia, plus there’s hydrochloric acid that’s
been released on land and some barrels that The ones in the river are headed downstream. We’re looking at
setting up decon over in the parking lot of Eastman Stadium.
There’s also a chlorine gas plume we thought was headed your way but it doesn’t look that way now.
Unfortunately, it’s headed for Washington Allston School.
PAUL SCHWOBODA:
Yes sir, Commander. Standing by.
MATT STEVERS:
We need to determine if we should evacuate the stadium or shelter in place. Can you give me a report on the
stadium? How many people are there?
PAUL SCHWOBODA:
I’d say 10 to 15 thousand, Commander.
MATT STEVERS:
How difficult would it be to get them out quickly?
PAUL SCHWOBODA:
Commander sir, It would be difficult. This place has a bad PA system that is difficult to understand and it tends
to bottle-neck up at the gates after events as it is.
MATT STEVERS:
Noted. We may have trouble getting enough resources there to do an efficient evacuation. Many of the
transport vehicles are already tied up. Do you have any reports from your stadium officers yet on the crowd
getting anxious?
PAUL SCHWOBODA:
No, not yet commander. I don’t think anyone knows what has happened yet.
MATT STEVERS:
Keep me posted and stand bye for further orders.
PAUL SCHWOBODA:
Roger that commander.
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Conclusion
As you have just sceen, when an incident as severe as a train derailment with chemicals occurs,
the response requires many different dedicated players to work in close coordination with each
other as the situation changes moment by moment.
Discussion 1: Emergency Management Roles
Competencies Addressed in This Discussion
?
?
Competency 2: Analyze emergency management principles in a community
impact context.
Competency 3: Articulate appropriate emergency management responses to
critical incidents.
For the purpose of this discussion, view the Emergency Response simulation from
this unit’s studies. In the simulation, the fire chief begins establishing incident
command before the emergency manager is on the scene. In many cases this will
be the norm. The emergency manager is not always on duty 24/7, but there is
usually a fire chief or other in command. These are usually the first responding
units or immediate backup. This is why it is important to have a basic
understanding of the Incident Command System. Many police and fire
departments require their personnel to be certified in the FEMA Incident
Command System by taking an ICS 100-200 and 700 course. The courses are also
required at some police and fire academies. These courses teach the basic
principles of what the fire chief is using in this emergency management scenario.
For your main post, discuss the roles of the emergency personnel in this simulation
by addressing the following:
?
?
?
Characterize the importance of each player in the simulation, without leaving
anyone out. Your course readings and two FEMA certifications completed in
previous units will help you understand the importance.
Define an alternative plan using ICS guidelines from your two FEMA
certifications and the course readings.
Defend your plan as opposed to the original plan.
Discussion Objectives
?
o
o
?
o
o
Competency 2: Analyze emergency management principles in a community
impact context.
Explain the value of the command structure in an emergency response.
Identify personnel involved in an emergency management response.
Competency 3: Articulate appropriate emergency management responses to
critical incidents.
Define an alternative plan using ICS guidelines.
Defend an alternative ICS plan against a current ICS plan.

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