Revising the Editorial Analysis

Here I will attach a draft of the editorial analysis in a word document ( EDITORIAL ANALYSIS final draft) . some corrections and information should be added to this draft where I attached a PDF (doc (10)) that contains the instructors’ comments and the changes needed. The editorial analysis’s topic can be found in this link ( https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/your-money/unusual-offi…)
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Editorial Analysis of “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind”
A usual boardroom meeting is profoundly designed towards outcomes, accompanied by
pressure and an agenda to achieve a positive result. However, according to the author, there is a
need to take these meetings out of the boardrooms and offices into other quiet environments.
Most people view this move as not the best idea to conduct a business meeting. Nevertheless,
once the meeting is taken into another environment, it will shift the focus from an outcome based
initiative to a process based one. This is through removing various factors, such as office body
language, electronics and intimidating action substances, which make offices and boardrooms
lack space for creative thinking. However, for some people, such meetings may end up being
unsuccessful as seen in the case of those who have no time or tend to be rather conservative and
straight up (Sullivan). The out of office meetings are not only beneficial to the CEOs and other
company leaders but also they play a huge role in bringing about positive client outcomes,
including retaining and attracting new employees (Boucher). Most employees seek for particular
benefits as they look for jobs; however, according to a study conducted by Technology Advice,
perquisites, such as gym and game rooms, also top the list.
The article “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind” by Paul Sullivan was
published in Wealth Matters in the New York Times. The article talks about why it is time office
meetings took some time off from the boardrooms and other official rooms. According to the
author, most entrepreneurs spend a lot of hours in their businesses, which leads to their
employees suffering from the exhaustion. Within boardrooms, where meetings occur, a lot of
distractions exist and, and sometimes, employees will be half focused on the meeting and half on
their devices. The adoption of informal meetings has turned out not only to improve employee
productivity and creativity but also helped businesses in meeting their goals and objectives. So,
this is the idea (Out of office meeting) that the author wants the audience to be convinced on, in
which he shows several evidences in order to send his message for them, and he succeed in that.
Ethos
Paul Sullivan is the editor of the Wealth matters column is the New York Times. His other
articles have featured in various magazines including Food & Wine, the Boston Globe, and the
International Herald Tribune. He worked for the Financial Times as an editor, columnist, and
reporter from 2000-2006. He has been interviewed by various television and radio channels
across the USA including Fox News, CNN, Marketplace, and NPR. His involvement with
famous magazine media companies and news and radio programs is an indication that Paul
Sullivan has a lot of experience on matters related to the business world. However, the author
does not reveal any information regarding his background; nevertheless, the information can be
accessed from his official biography web page, both on the New York Times page and his
account.
The author shows a professional persona indicating he is competent and has a lot of
knowledge in what he is discussing. This is evident from the numerous examples he provides to
support his arguments including studies. For instance, one of the example’s he states is about the
importance of the out of office meeting; “But more elaborate perks like game rooms and gym
membership were important when it came to retaining workers, according to a study from
Technology Advice, a marketing agency in Nashville.” This information can help to persuade the
readers to apply this type of meeting. Additionally, by not relying on only one source to bring
forward his points, the credibility of this information is assured. Sullivan uses a concerned and
persuasive tone in bringing forward his message. His worried tone is obvious from the following
quote: “Entrepreneurs have a reputation for working long hours to get their businesses up and
running, leading some of their employees to a quick burnout.” His strong tone is evident from the
numerous examples he has provided on firms that have adopted out of office meeting strategies.
In all the examples given, the results are positive for the enterprise, employees, and customers.
An example is seen from Health Media Network’s COO Larry Newman who made his first sale
while surfing with the customer.
The author’s ethos is strong based on his persona, tone, and credentials. The author has
worked for other top magazine media firms such as the Financial Times among others. He has
used a professional tone in bringing forward his message. The professionalism has played a huge
role in ensuring that people who read the article make informed decisions. His tone, which is full
of concern and persuasion, indicates the topic being addressed is of great importance to people,
and they should put the practices provided in play.
Pathos
For an author to fully persuade the readers, he/she must appeal to the reader in a way that will
evoke emotions thus calling for a course of action (Rabinowitz 328). To evoke these emotions,
Sullivan, states that a lot of business owners have a reputation for working for many hours to
ensure their business attain their goals. However, in the process, this affects the employees in the
long-run as they end up suffering from burnouts. This introduction by the author is built to evoke
emotions in the reader on why there is a need to come up with a solution to curb it. Sullivan
evokes eagerness emotions from his readers. As a reader goes through this article, one will get to
see how other businesses have become successful in applying the out of office meetings. They
have seen their firms reducing employee turnovers, making huge business deals and increasing
revenues for the companies. “David Heath, co-founder and chief executive of Bombas…, said
the company had a 96 percent retention rate … He attributed the low turnover to unconventional
meeting spots,” (Sullivan). Once the readers get to see all the examples provided by the author,
they will have emotions of enthusiasms as they would like to attain the same achievements as the
companies listed. Sullivan has successfully appealed to the readers shared values. This is through
showing the effects of having a lot of office and boardroom bound meetings. From the different
examples provided on achievement by the firms, emotions of eagerness and the motivation tone
have been successfully evoked in the readers.
Logos
From the article by Sullivan, he presents arguments for the importance of having out of office
meetings and its impacts. He states that meetings that occur in the office in most cases do not
have positive outcomes to the business, leaders including employees. The primary reason for
poor employee and employer productivity is burnout, which is attributed to the many hours they
spend in their offices. He concludes that in case companies opt for an out of office meeting and
other involvements, it will see an increase in employee productivity, reduced turnovers and
positive business outcomes. In supporting his arguments, Sullivan uses sources from numerous
business leaders who have applied the out of office meeting strategy. An example is seen in the
case of Marco Schnabl who is the CEO and founder of Mastermind. He states that the employees
in his firm have tripled in just 12 months and this is due to the walk meetings he introduced. His
employees have a one-hour extended walk to exercise their bodies and discuss relevant matters
about the business (Sullivan). Sullivan has also quoted Jennifer Chatman, a management
professor at Haas School of Business. She states that out of office meetings do not just bring
people together but make work much more fun. This, in the long run, increases the motivation
and performance of employees. This and other businesses mentioned provide enough evidence to
show that his arguments are rightful. To more clarification, by providing real examples of the
significance of the untraditional meetings, the audience will be more convinced by the author’s
idea, and they will have the desire to implement this kind of meetings.
Conclusion
Employee production, reduction in turnovers and successful business deals have been made
possible by firms that adopt out of office meetings. This is evident from the article “When Office
Meetings Leave the Office Behind” by Paul Sullivan. The author has provided enough evidence
using different firms that have applied the strategy. The businesses have seen an increased
employee performance including a reduction of employee turnover rates. The businesses also
could increase their revenues following successful out of office deals with various customers.
However, for one to successfully implement this strategy, the business leaders should create time
and not be too conservative and straight up.
Works Cited
Paul Sullivan, “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind”, The New York Times, 1
September 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/your-money/unusual-office-
meetings.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FEnvironment. Accessed 21 September
2017.
Peter Boucher, “How flexible working can benefit you and your employees”, The Guardian, 15
April 2013, https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2013/apr/15/top-tipsto-allow-flexible-working. Accessed 21 September 2017.
Paul Sullivan Biography, http://pauljsullivan.com/bio/. Accessed 21 September 2017
Rabinowitz, Tova. Exploring typography. Cengage Learning, 2016, https://books.google.com.
Accessed 21 September 2017.
Sarah Ali
Instructor: Melanie Moroz
English 102- 025
26 September 2017
Editorial Analysis of “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind”
A usual boardroom meeting is profoundly designed towards outcomes, accompanied by
pressure and an agenda to achieve a positive result. However, according to the author, there is a
need to take these meetings out of the boardrooms and offices into other quiet environments.
Most people view this move as not the best idea to conduct a business meeting. Nevertheless,
once the meeting is taken into another environment, it will shift the focus from an outcome based
initiative to a process based one. This is through removing various factors, such as office body
language, electronics and intimidating action substances, which make offices and boardrooms
lack space for creative thinking. However, for some people, such meetings may end up being
unsuccessful as seen in the case of those who have no time or tend to be rather conservative and
straight up (Sullivan). The out of office meetings are not only beneficial to the CEOs and other
company leaders but also they play a huge role in bringing about positive client outcomes,
including retaining and attracting new employees (Boucher). Most employees seek for particular
benefits as they look for jobs; however, according to a study conducted by Technology Advice,
perquisites, such as gym and game rooms, also top the list.
The article “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind” by Paul Sullivan was
published in Wealth Matters in the New York Times. The article talks about why it is time office
meetings took some time off from the boardrooms and other official rooms. According to the
author, most entrepreneurs spend a lot of hours in their businesses, which leads to their
employees suffering from the exhaustion. Within boardrooms, where meetings occur, a lot of
distractions exist and, and sometimes, employees will be half focused on the meeting and half on
their devices. The adoption of informal meetings has turned out not only to improve employee
productivity and creativity but also helped businesses in meeting their goals and objectives. So,
this is the idea (Out of office meeting) that the author wants the audience to be convinced on, in
which he shows several evidences in order to send his message for them, and he succeed in that.
Ethos
Paul Sullivan is the editor of the Wealth matter column is the New York Times. His other articles
have featured in various magazines including Food & Wine, the Boston Globe, and the
International Herald Tribune. He worked for the Financial Times as an editor, columnist, and
reporter from 2000-2006. He has been interviewed by various television and radio channels
across the USA including Fox News, CNN, Marketplace, and NPR. His involvement with
famous magazine media companies and news and radio programs is an indication that Paul
Sullivan has a lot of experience on matters related to the business world. However, the author
does not reveal any information regarding his background; nevertheless, the information can be
accessed from his official biography web page, both on the New York Times page and his
account.
The author shows a professional persona indicating he is competent and has a lot of
knowledge in what he is discussing. This is evident from the numerous examples he provides to
support his arguments including studies. For instance, one of the example’s he states is about the
importance of the out of office meeting; “But more elaborate perks like game rooms and gym
membership were important when it came to retaining workers, according to a study from
Technology Advice, a marketing agency in Nashville.” This information can help to persuade the
readers to apply this type of meeting. Additionally, by not relying on only one source to bring
forward his points, the credibility of this information is assured. Sullivan uses a concerned and
persuasive tone in bringing forward his message. His worried tone is obvious from the following
quote: “Entrepreneurs have a reputation for working long hours to get their businesses up and
running, leading some of their employees to a quick burnout.” His strong tone is evident from the
numerous examples he has provided on firms that have adopted out of office meeting strategies.
In all the examples given, the results are positive for the enterprise, employees, and customers.
An example is seen from Health Media Network’s COO Larry Newman who made his first sale
while surfing with the customer.
The author’s ethos is strong based on his persona, tone, and credentials. The author has
worked for other top magazine media firms such as the Financial Times among others. He has
used a professional tone in bringing forward his message. The professionalism has played a huge
role in ensuring that people who read the article make informed decisions. His tone, which is full
of concern and persuasion, indicates the topic being addressed is of great importance to people,
and they should put the practices provided in play.
Pathos
For an author to fully persuade the readers, he/she must appeal to the reader in a way that will
evoke emotions thus calling for a course of action (Rabinowitz 328). To evoke these emotions,
Sullivan, states that a lot of business owners have a reputation for working for many hours to
ensure their business attain their goals. However, in the process, this affects the employees in the
long-run as they end up suffering from burnouts. This introduction by the author is built to evoke
emotions in the reader on why there is a need to come up with a solution to curb it. Sullivan
evokes eagerness emotions from his readers. As a reader goes through this article, one will get to
see how other businesses have become successful in applying the out of office meetings. They
have seen their firms reducing employee turnovers, making huge business deals and increasing
revenues for the companies. “David Heath, co-founder and chief executive of Bombas…, said
the company had a 96 percent retention rate … He attributed the low turnover to unconventional
meeting spots,” (Sullivan). Once the readers get to see all the examples provided by the author,
they will have emotions of enthusiasms as they would like to attain the same achievements as the
companies listed. Sullivan has successfully appealed to the readers shared values. This is through
showing the effects of having a lot of office and boardroom bound meetings. From the different
examples provided on achievement by the firms, emotions of eagerness and the motivation tone
have been successfully evoked in the readers.
Logos
From the article by Sullivan, he presents arguments for the importance of having out of office
meetings and its impacts. He states that meetings that occur in the office in most cases do not
have positive outcomes to the business, leaders including employees. The primary reason for
poor employee and employer productivity is burnout, which is attributed to the many hours they
spend in their offices. He concludes that in case companies opt for an out of office meeting and
other involvements, it will see an increase in employee productivity, reduced turnovers and
positive business outcomes. In supporting his arguments, Sullivan uses sources from numerous
business leaders who have applied the out of office meeting strategy. An example is seen in the
case of Marco Schnabl who is the CEO and founder of Mastermind. He states that the employees
in his firm have tripled in just 12 months and this is due to the walk meetings he introduced. His
employees have a one-hour extended walk to exercise their bodies and discuss relevant matters
about the business (Sullivan). Sullivan has also quoted Jennifer Chatman, a management
professor at Haas School of Business. She states that out of office meetings do not just bring
people together but make work much more fun. This, in the long run, increases the motivation
and performance of employees. This and other businesses mentioned provide enough evidence to
show that his arguments are rightful. To more clarification, by providing real examples of the
significance of the untraditional meetings, the audience will be more convinced by the author’s
idea, and they will have the desire to implement this kind of meetings.
Conclusion
Employee production, reduction in turnovers and successful business deals have been made
possible by firms that adopt out of office meetings. This is evident from the article “When Office
Meetings Leave the Office Behind” by Paul Sullivan. The author has provided enough evidence
using different firms that have applied the strategy. The businesses have seen an increased
employee performance including a reduction of employee turnover rates. The businesses also
could increase their revenues following successful out of office deals with various customers.
However, for one to successfully implement this strategy, the business leaders should create time
and not be too conservative and straight up.
Works Cited
Paul Sullivan, “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind”, The New York Times, 1
September 2017, https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/01/your-money/unusual-officemeetings.html?rref=collection%2Ftimestopic%2FEnvironment. Accessed 21 September
2017.
Peter Boucher, “How flexible working can benefit you and your employees”, The Guardian, 15
April 2013, https://www.theguardian.com/small-business-network/2013/apr/15/top-tipsto-allow-flexible-working. Accessed 21 September 2017.
Paul Sullivan Biography, http://pauljsullivan.com/bio/. Accessed 21 September 2017
Rabinowitz, Tova. Exploring typography. Cengage Learning, 2016, https://books.google.com.
Accessed 21 September 2017.
Editorial Analysis of “When Office Meetings Leave the Office Behind”
A usual boardroom meeting is profoundly designed towards outcomes, accompanied by
pressure and an agenda to achieve a positive result. However, according to the author, there is a
need to take these meetings out of the boardrooms and offices into other quiet environments.
Most people view this move as not the best idea to conduct a business meeting. Nevertheless,
once the meeting is taken into another environment, it will shift the focus from an outc …
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