Understanding Human Behavior and the Social Environment

As you have been exploring human behavior and the social environment, you have likely increased your awareness of the many biological, psychological, and sociological factors that affect individual behavior. Human relationships are complex, and social workers may find it difficult to keep these important interactions in mind when addressing a client’s needs. Murray Bowen (as cited in Zastrow & Kirst-Ashman, 2016, p. 595) developed the genogram, a tool to help social workers and other practitioners create a record of family relationships. Once a social worker creates a genogram for a client, he or she may refer to it when analyzing the client’s situation.To prepare for this Assignment, become familiar with how to create a genogram, which is presented in this week’s resources. Also, review this week’s media about Juan and Elena Hernandez’s visit with their social worker.Submit a 2- to 4-page paper that includes the following:A genogram of the Hernandez familyAn analysis of the Hernandez family’s case based on the genogram including the following information.Identify an element of the Hernandez family’s case that may influence the way Juan and Elena Hernandez address their issue with the social worker.Explain how the genogram you created might help you address the needs of the Hernandez family.Support your Assignment with specific references to the resources. Be sure to provide full APA citations for your references.ReferencePlummer, S.-B., Makris, S., Brocksen S. (Eds.). (2014). Sessions: Case histories. Baltimore, MD: Laureate International Universities Publishing. [Vital Source e-reader].”The Hernandez Family” (pp. 3–5)Zastrow, C. H., & Kirst-Ashman, K. K. (2016). Understanding human behavior and the social environment (10th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.Chapter 12, “Sociological Aspects of Young and Middle Adulthood” (pp. 549-616)
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Hernandez Family Episode 6
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Program Transcript
FEMALE SPEAKER: So last week I showed you how to make a genogram, like
this one. Now, the idea behind making a genogram is to help you draw a picture
of your family history. And then we use that to discuss the relationships and
connections among your relatives. OK? So Juan, why don’t you start off and talk
about what you came up with.
JUAN HERNANDEZ: So we’re starting with my family. My father, Hector, he’s still
alive. And he married my mother, Freda. And she passed away two years ago.
And then there’s their children, myself– I’m the oldest– and then there’s my three
sisters, Marie, Senta, and Rose.
FEMALE SPEAKER: Good. And Elena, what about your family?
ELENA HERNANDEZ: Well, here’s my father, Anthony. He met and married my
mother, Sofia. They are both still alive. They had five children. Firstborn was my
brother Daniel, then my brother Tomas, then my sisters Martina and Camila, and
there’s me, the baby.
And then I met Juan, and we started our own family. And we have two beautiful
sons that you met, one, Junior, who is eight, and Alberto, who is six.
FEMALE SPEAKER: Good. So for the last several weeks we’ve been talking a lot
about how you discipline your sons at home. And both of you mentioned how
your parents used to punish you when you were growing up. Juan, why don’t you
talk about that and point to anybody on the genogram as you mention them?
JUAN HERNANDEZ: Sure. So my dad, when he was mad at me he would send
me to get books from the encyclopedia. And he’d make me hold them out,
straight out like this, until he told me to stop. It caused so much pain in my arms,
I mean, my arms felt like they would break off.
And my mom, she did basically the same thing. Except when she was really
mad, when would make me get more books than my dad. I hated those books so
much. I never went near them on my own. To me, they only meant one thing,
misery. And now, I guess I inherited that from them.
FEMALE SPEAKER: Elena, how about you?
ELENA HERNANDEZ: Yes, misery. That’s what it was like for me, too.
©2013 Laureate Education, Inc.
1
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Additional Content Attribution
MUSIC:
Music by Clean Cuts
Original Art and Photography Provided By:
Brian Kline and Nico Danks
©2013 Laureate Education, Inc.
2
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Program Transcript
FEMALE SPEAKER: So last week I showed you how to make a genogram, like
this one. Now, the idea behind making a genogram is to help you draw a picture
of your family history. And then we use that to discuss the relationships and
connections among your relatives. OK? So Juan, why don’t you start off and talk
about what you came up with.
JUAN HERNANDEZ: So we’re starting with my family. My father, Hector, he’s still
alive. And he married my mother, Freda. And she passed away two years ago.
And then there’s their children, myself– I’m the oldest– and then there’s my three
sisters, Marie, Senta, and Rose.
FEMALE SPEAKER: Good. And Elena, what about your family?
ELENA HERNANDEZ: Well, here’s my father, Anthony. He met and married my
mother, Sofia. They are both still alive. They had five children. Firstborn was my
brother Daniel, then my brother Tomas, then my sisters Martina and Camila, and
there’s me, the baby.
And then I met Juan, and we started our own family. And we have two beautiful
sons that you met, one, Junior, who is eight, and Alberto, who is six.
FEMALE SPEAKER: Good. So for the last several weeks we’ve been talking a lot
about how you discipline your sons at home. And both of you mentioned how
your parents used to punish you when you were growing up. Juan, why don’t you
talk about that and point to anybody on the genogram as you mention them?
JUAN HERNANDEZ: Sure. So my dad, when he was mad at me he would send
me to get books from the encyclopedia. And he’d make me hold them out,
straight out like this, until he told me to stop. It caused so much pain in my arms,
I mean, my arms felt like they would break off.
And my mom, she did basically the same thing. Except when she was really
mad, when would make me get more books than my dad. I hated those books so
much. I never went near them on my own. To me, they only meant one thing,
misery. And now, I guess I inherited that from them.
FEMALE SPEAKER: Elena, how about you?
ELENA HERNANDEZ: Yes, misery. That’s what it was like for me, too.
©2013 Laureate Education, Inc.
1
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Hernandez Family Episode 6
Additional Content Attribution
MUSIC:
Music by Clean Cuts
Original Art and Photography Provided By:
Brian Kline and Nico Danks
©2013 Laureate Education, Inc.
2
PRINTED BY: bonita.mcmorris@waldenu.edu. Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may be reproduced
or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
The Hernandez Family
Juan Hernandez (27) and Elena Hernandez (25) are a married Latino couple who were referred to the New York City Administration for
Children Services (ACS) for abuse allegations. They have an 8-year-old son, Juan Jr., and a 6-year-old son, Alberto. They were married 7
years ago, soon after Juan Jr. was born. Juan and Elena were both born in Puerto Rico and raised in Queens, New York. They rent a twobedroom apartment in an apartment complex where they have lived for 7 years. Elena works as babysitter for a family that lives nearby, and
Juan works at the airport in the baggage department. Overall, their physical health is good, although Elena was diagnosed with diabetes this
past year and Juan has some lower back issues from loading and unloading bags. Both drink socially with friends and family. Juan goes out
with friends on the weekends sometimes to “blow off steam,” having six to eight beers, and Elena drinks sparingly, only one or two drinks a
month. Both deny any drug use at all. While they do not attend church regularly, both identify as being Catholic and observe all religious
holidays. Juan was arrested once as a juvenile for petty theft, but that has been expunged from his file. Elena has no criminal history. They
have a large support network of friends and family who live nearby, and both Elena’s and Juan’s parents live within blocks of their apartment
and visit frequently. Juan and Elena both enjoy playing cards with family and friends on the weekends and taking the boys out to the park and
beach near their home.
ACS was contacted by the school social worker from Juan Jr.’s school after he described a punishment his parents used when he talked
back to them. He told her that his parents made him kneel for hours while holding two encyclopedias (one in each hand) and that this was a
punishment used on multiple occasions. The ACS worker deemed this a credible concern and made a visit to the home. During the visit, the
parents admitted to using this particular form of punishment with their children when they misbehaved. In turn, the social worker from ACS
mandated the family to attend weekly family sessions and complete a parenting group at their local community mental health agency. In her
report sent to the mental health agency, the ACS social worker indicated that the form of punishment used by the parents was deemed abusive
and that the parents needed to learn new and appropriate parenting skills. She also suggested they receive education about child development
because she believed they had unrealistic expectations of how children at their developmental stage should behave. This was a particular
concern with Juan Sr., who repeatedly stated that if the boys listened, stayed quiet, and followed all of their rules they would not be punished.
There was a sense from the ACS worker that Juan Sr. treated his sons, especially Juan Jr., as adults and not as children. This was exhibited, she
believed, by a clear lack of patience and understanding on his part when the boys did not follow all of his directions perfectly or when they
played in the home. She mandated family sessions along with the parenting classes to address these issues.
During the intake session, when I met the family for the first time, both Juan and Elena were clearly angry that they had been referred to
parenting classes and family sessions. They both felt they had done nothing wrong, and they stated that they were only punishing their children
as they were punished as children in Puerto Rico. They said that their parents made them hold heavy books or other objects as they kneeled
and they both stressed that at times the consequences for not behaving had been much worse. Both Juan and Elena were “beaten” (their term)
by their parents. Elena’s parents used a switch, and Juan’s parents used a belt. As a result, they feel they are actually quite lenient with their
children, and they said they never hit them and they never would. Both stated that they love their children very much and struggle to give them
a good life. They both stated that the boys are very active and don’t always follow the rules and the kneeling punishment is the only thing that
works when they “don’t want to listen.”
They both admitted that they made the boys hold two large encyclopedias for up to two hours while kneeling when they did something
wrong. They stated the boys are “hyperactive” and “need a lot of attention.” They said they punish Juan Jr. more often because he is
particularly defiant and does not listen and also because he is older and should know better. They see him as a role model for his younger
brother and feel he should take that responsibility to heart. His misbehavior indicates to them that he is not taking that duty seriously and
therefore he should be punished, both to learn his lesson and to show his younger brother what could happen if he does not behave.
During the intake meeting, Juan Sr. stated several times that he puts in overtime any time he can because money is “tight.” He expressed
great concern about having to attend the parenting classes and family sessions, as it would interfere with that overtime. Elena appeared anxious
during the initial meeting and repeatedly asked if they were going to lose the boys. I told her I
PRINTED BY: bonita.mcmorris@waldenu.edu. Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may be
reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
could not assure her that they would not, but I could assist her and her husband through this process by making sure we had a plan that
satisfied the ACS worker’s requirements. I told them it would be up to them to complete those plans successfully. I offered my support through
this process and conveyed empathy around their response to the situation.
The Hernandez Family
Juan Hernandez: father, 27
Elena Hernandez: mother, 25
Juan Hernandez Jr.: son, 8
Alberto Hernandez: son, 6
Together we discussed the plan for treatment, following the requirements of ACS; they would attend a 12-week Positive Parenting
Program (PPP) along with weekly family sessions. In an effort to reduce some of the financial burden of attending multiple meetings at the
agency, I offered to meet with the family either just before or immediately after the PPP so that they did not have to come to the agency more
than once a week. They agreed that this would be helpful because they did not have money for multiple trips to the agency, although Juan Sr.
stated that this would still affect his ability to work overtime on that day. I asked if they had any goals they wanted to work toward during our
sessions. Initially they were reluctant to share anything, and then Elena suggested that a discussion on money management would be helpful. I
told them I would be their primary contact at the agency—meeting with them for the family sessions and co-facilitating the PPP group with an
intern. I explained my limitations around confidentiality, and they signed a form acknowledging that I was required to share information about
our sessions with the ACS worker. I informed them that the PPP is an evidenced-based program and explained its meaning. I informed them
that there is a pre- and post-test administered along with the program and specific guidelines about missed classes. They were informed that if
they missed more than three classes, their participation would be deemed incomplete and they would not get their PPP certification.
Initially, when the couple attended parenting sessions and family sessions, Juan Sr. expressed feelings of anger and resentment for being
mandated to attend services at the agency. Several times he either refused to participate by remaining quiet or spoke to the social worker and
intern in a demeaning manner. He did this by questioning our ability to teach the PPP and the effectiveness of the program itself, wanting to
know how this was going to make him a better parent. He also reiterated his belief that his form of discipline worked and that it was exactly
what his family members used for years on him and his relatives. He asked, “If it worked for them, why can’t that form of punishment work
for me and my children?” He emphasized that these were his children. He maintained throughout the sessions that he never hit his children and
never would. Both he and Elena often talked about their love for their children and the devastation they would feel if they were ever taken
away from them.
Treatment consisted of weekly parenting classes with the goal of teaching them effective and safe discipline skills (such as setting limits
through the use of time-out and taking away privileges). Further, the classes emphasized the importance of recognizing age-appropriate
behavior. We spent sessions reviewing child development techniques to help boost their children’s self-esteem and sense of confidence. We
also talked about managing one’s frustration (such as when to take a break when angry) and helping their children to do the same.
Family sessions were built around helping the family members express themselves in a safe environment. The parents and the children
were asked to talk about how they felt about each other and the reason they were mandated to treatment. They were asked to share how they
felt while at home interacting with one another. I thought it was of particular importance to have them talk about their feelings related to the
call to ACS, as I was unsure how Juan Sr. felt about Juan Jr.’s report to the social worker. It was necessary to assist them with processing this
situation so that there were no residual negative feelings between father and son. I asked them to role-play—having each member act like
another member of the household. This was very effective in helping Juan Sr. see how his boys view him and his behavior toward them when
he comes home from work. As a result of this exercise, he verbalized his newfound clarity around how the boys have been seeing him as a
very angry and negative father.
I also used sessions to explore the parents’ backgrounds. Using a genogram, we identified patterns among their family members that have
continued through generations. These patterns included the use of discipline to maintain order in the home and the potentially unrealistic
expectations the elders had for their children and grandchildren. Elena stated that she was treated like an adult and had the responsibilities of a
person much older than herself while she was still very young. Juan Sr. said he felt responsible for bringing money into the home at an early
age. He was forced by his parents to get working papers as soon as he turned 14. His paychecks were then taken by his parents each week and
used to pay for groceries and other bills. He expressed anger at his parents for encouraging him to drop out of high school so that he could get
more than one job to help out with the finances.
Other sessions focused on the burden they felt related to their finances and how that burden might be felt by the boys, just as Juan Sr.
might have felt growing up. In one session, Juan Jr. expressed his fears of being evicted and the lights being turned off, because his father
often talked of not having money for bills. Both boys expressed sadness over the amount of time their father spent at work and stressed their
desire to do more things with him at night and on the weekends. Both parents stated they did not realize the boys understood their anxieties
around
PRINTED BY: bonita.mcmorris@waldenu.edu. Printing is for personal, private use only. No part of this book may be
reproduced or transmitted without publisher’s prior permission. Violators will be prosecuted.
paying bills and felt sad that they worried about these issues. We also took a couple of sessions to address money management. We worked
together to create a budget and identify unnecessary expenses that might be eliminated.
Key to Acronyms
ACS: Administration for Children Services
PPP: Positive Parenting Program
It was clear that this was a family that loved each other very much. Juan Sr. and Elena were often affectionate with each other and their
sons. Once the initial anger subsided, both Juan Sr. and Elena fully engaged in both the family sessions and the PPP. We assessed their
progress monthly and highlighted that progress. I also was aware that it was important to learn about the Hernandez family history and culture
in order to understand their perspective and emotions around the ACS referral. I asked them many questions about their beliefs, customs, and
culture to learn about how they view parenthood, marriage roles, and children’s behaviors. They were always open to these questions and
seemed pleased that I asked about these things rather than assumed I knew the answers.
During the course of treatment they missed a total of four PPP classes. I received a call from Elena each time letting me know that Juan Sr.
had to work overtime and they would miss the class. She was always apologetic and would tell me she would like to know what they missed in
the class so that she could review it on her own. During a call after the fourth missed parenting class, I reminded Elena that in order to obtain
the certificate of completion, they were expected to attend a minimum of nine classes. By missing this last class, I explained, they were not
going to get the certificate. Elena expressed fear about this and asked if there was any way they could still receive it. She explained that they
only had one car and that she had to miss the classes when Juan Sr. could not go because she had no way of getting to the agency on her own. I
told her that I did not have the authority to change the rules around the number of classes missed and that I understood how disappointed she
was to hear they would not get the certificate. When I told her I had to call the ACS worker and let her know, Elena got very quiet and started
to cry. I spoke with her for a while, and we talked about the possible repercussions.
I met with my supervisor and informed her of what had occurred. I knew I had to tell the ACS worker that they would not receive the
certificate of completion this round, and I felt bad for the situation Juan Sr. and Elena and their boys were now in. I had been meeting with
them for family sessions and parenting classes for almost three months by this point and had built a strong rapport. I feared that once I called
the ACS worker, that rapport would be broken and they would no longer want to work with me. I saw them as loving and caring parents who
were trying the best they could to provide for their family. They had been making progress, particularly Juan Sr., and I did not want their work
to be in vain.
I also questioned whether the parenting and family sessions were really necessary for their situation. I felt there was a lack of cultural
competence on the part of the ACS worker—she had made some rather judgmen …
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